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Posts Tagged ‘Mains’

From Dish Erin:

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Because turmeric is underused in American cuisine, is such a bold flavor, and has the potential to temporarily stain your hands and dishes (don’t worry, it’s nothing a good scrubbing and soaking can’t fix), many people can be hesitant of cooking with it. But it’s really nothing to be scared of. This is an alternative to traditional stir fry that is perfect for a turmeric newbie. It’s also a super quick weeknight meal.

Oh, and just in case you needed another reason to try it: Turmeric is kind of a magical spice. It’s linked to lower rates of Alzheimer’s disease, and is thought to aid in preventing certain types of cancers. Tests have also shown that turmeric is an anti-inflammatory, which helps to reduce and treat arthritis, psoriasis, and even may lower cholesterol.

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1-2 tablespoons peanut or canola oil

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts or thighs, sliced into 1 inch pieces

1 yellow onion, sliced thin

2 garlic cloves, minced

Shake or two of cayenne pepper

1 heaping tablespoon (or 2) of turmeric

1/2 inch fresh ginger, grated (or you can use 1 teaspoon dried ginger)

2 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1/2 cup of chicken stock

1 head of broccolini or broccoli florets

1 cup of mushrooms, sliced thin

Heat oil in a wok or sauté pan. When hot add the chicken and cook for a few minutes until the pink fades.

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Add the onion and garlic, stir or shake the pan to coat everything in the oil and cook for a few minutes until the onions are translucent. Make a well in the center and add the ginger.

Add the cayenne and turmeric, and again stir to coat everything in the spices.  The pan will immediately turn an amazing, bright yellow color.

Stir again to coat then add the soy sauce, butter, and chicken stock. Then add the broccoli and mushrooms and allow everything to simmer for just shy of 5 minutes.

Serve over rice.

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Saucy Little Dish is trying something new!  Each month we will be working with a different ingredient and each Dish will create a dish using that ingredient.  We are excited to start the Spring 2013 off with Endive/Chicory.

In addition to our new theme months, SLD would like to introduce our newest dish, Beth Harrell.  Beth is originally from Florida and we met this saucy thing in Williamburg, Brooklyn and she now lives in Chicago.  Not only has she lived in all sorts of culinary hubs, she studied the art of baking and pastry at Le Cordon Bleu Paris.  I don’t know about you, but I know we are excited to see what Beth whips up!

From Dish Beth:

(inspired by El Almacen’s Ensalada de Palmito) Yields 6 servings

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I’ve always thought of endive as the stuck up, snooty little finger food of fancy pants ladies luncheons. Other than an elegant vehicle for stuffing cheesy, mayonnaisey dips down my gullet, I didn’t really know what else it was good for. That is, until, I had this delightful truffled endive and heart of palm salad at El Almacen, an awesome Argentinian restaurant in my old neighborhood, Williamsburg, Brooklyn.  Since I live in Chicago now, I decided I’d try and make this thing at home.

Slightly bitter endive, its chicory sister radicchio, and tangy heart of palm, are tossed with large flakes of buttery, salty parmesan and a simple truffle vinaigrette. Since it’s spring, I’ve also added some white asparagus to the mix. Earthy and decadent, this would be a perfect start to a romantic dinner with your hunny bunny. But I wouldn’t know anything about that. Guh.

Here goes…

2 endives (the whiter the leaf, the less bitter the taste)

White asparagus (about 6-8 stalks)

Small head of radicchio

8 oz jar of heart of palm, drained

1/2 cup apple cider vinegar

Big handful of salt

Truffle Vinaigrette (recipe below)

Parmesan cheese (not the powdery pizza kind. Get a wedge and shave flakes off with a vegetable peeler. This is a CLASSY salad, dammit!)

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Slice the endive, radicchio, asparagus and heart of palm into long, thin strips. Make sure to cut the top and base off of the endive and asparagus. Place all but the heart of palm into large bowl with the apple cider vinegar and salt. Toss to coat and let sit for 30 minutes or so (you want to slightly pickle them). Place in colander to drain. Rinse with cold water (don’t have to totally wash all vinegar away, just give it a quick rinse), return to bowl

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Add heart of palm. Toss with Truffle Vinaigrette and sprinkle with parmesan before serving.

Truffle Vinaigrette

Shallot (or small onion, shallots are just expensive onions anyway)

2-3 T white truffle oil (If you’re on a specialty oil budget, you can sometimes find this shit for cheap at TJ Maxx)

2 T extra virgin olive oil

1-2 T champagne vinegar

Salt and pepper to taste

Grate the onion/shallot right into the bowl and then pour/sprinkle in remaining ingredients. Whisk and taste and  whisk and taste, adding more as needed until it’s to your liking.

Oh yeah! And for the record, it’s pronounced on-DEEV, not N-dive. Enjoy lovers!

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From Dish Rachelle:
Clam chowder
I’m pretty sure that in my lifetime I’ve done some serious damage to the clam population of the Northeast. Some of my favorite dishes – and my family’s favorite dishes – center around this one simple ingredient. I grew up eating fried clam strips with tartar sauce with my Mom at Howard Johnson’s at brunch on Sundays and at fish fry places on the boardwalk at the Jersey Shore. I always ordered the chalky New England clam chowder at Friendly’s when I was little (and we know what a big part Friendly’s played in my childhood). I’ve known my father to cook three dishes, and three dishes only: 1) “Cheese eggs” (aka scrambled eggs with American cheese) 2) Linguine with white clam sauce and 3) Baked clams (see the bottom of this post for a neat trick he taught me). I love Zuppa di Clams and even raw ones on the half shell with cocktail sauce. This is really just starting to sound like a survey of New Jersey restaurant menus.

I’ve made Manhattan clam chowder before (“red”) but never New England. I was very pleasantly surprised. Sorry, clams – this might become another go-to.

Ingredients (makes 2 entrée-sized portions or 4 appetizers)

18 raw whole clams, shells on
2 strips bacon, chopped
Olive oil
½ large yellow onion, chopped
splash of dry white wine
1 large baking potato, diced small
clam stock (see below)
1/3 cup corn kernels, fresh or frozen
2 tablespoons heavy cream
1 tablespoon cornstarch (optional)
Ground pepper

Start by steaming your clams open. In a large, deep saucepan, place rinsed clams (shells on) in about a half-inch of water. Cover and steam over medium-high heat, giving the pan a shake every few minutes. Cook until the water looks foamy and the shells are all wide open, about 10 minutes.
Steamed clams
With tongs, remove the clams to a bowl. Do not drain or discard the clammy water at the bottom of your saucepan, because this will become the base of your stock! Remove the clam meat from the shells and reserve for later. Place the empty shells back in the saucepan and add about a pint and a half of water, covering and bringing it up to a simmer. Let this cook while you prepare your other ingredients.
Coming out of their shells
Clam stock
Cook the chopped bacon in a soup/stew pot over medium heat. When it looks about done, add the onions and a little bit of olive oil so they don’t stick, and soften. Deglaze with the white wine and add the potatoes.
Diced potato
Return to your clam stock and taste it. It will likely be very salty. Remove shells* and pour the liquid through a cheese cloth to remove any sand or grit that has come from them, and then pour the strained liquid straight into your soup pot. Add some fresh water if necessary to cover ingredients and dilute the salt. Bring to a simmer and cook, mostly covered, about 15 minutes.

Check your potatoes and make sure they’re done. If so, roughly chop the clam meat and add to the pot along with any liquids that emerged. Add the corn and stir. Cook, mostly covered, over low heat for another 5 minutes.
Chopped clam
Add heavy cream and if you prefer a thicker soup, the cornstarch (you can dissolve it in a little bit of warm water first to make a paste so that it’s not gritty in your mouth). Plate and season with ground pepper.

*You can toss them, or rinse and save them for another use. My Dad used to make baked clams using canned clams – easy, but without the benefit of shells for easy baking and nice presentation. No problem: when he ordered clams casino at a restaurant, he used to ask the waiter if he could keep the empty shells so that the next time he felt to urge to make baked clams he’d have them on hand.
Mutual admiration society, clam edition

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From Dish Danielle:

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Over holiday break I spent a cozy week in Northern Indiana’s cornfield country with my beau and his family. It was much colder than it’s been here in Brooklyn, and one snowy evening, I caught a hankering for some sort of ‘red wine & chicken’ supper. After a short trip to their local organic market and an even shorter trip into Evelyn’s pantry (where she’s got her summer garden’s remaining bounty) she & I decided to whip up our own speedier rendition of the French classic ‘Coq au Vin.’

Ingredients:

  • olive oil
  • 2 large chicken breasts w/skin, cut in half
  • 4 chicken thighs with skin
  • cumin
  • S&P
  • about 2 c dry red wine (we used a pinot noir that was on hand)
  • 3 shallots, diced
  • 1 HUGE leek, sliced & rinsed thoroughly
  • 6 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 6 fresh rosemary springs
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 add’l garlic cloves sliced thin
  • 1 tbsp whole black peppercorns
  • 2 tbsps all purpose flour
  • 1 ½ c chicken stock
  • 1 c beef stock
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 4 carrots, peeled & diced into 1½ ” pieces
  • 4 parsnips, peeled & diced into 1½” pieces

The first thing we did was prep the chicken: I consulted a few recipes online, and most of them called for an overnight marinade. As it was already after 7pm, Evelyn and I decided to give the chicken a nice flavorful rub to ensure its deliciousness and eliminate the need to put the meal off another day. So: pat chicken dry and sprinkle cumin, salt & pepper on all sides liberally. Then rub the minced garlic onto chicken on all sides.

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Place a deep cast iron over medium high heat. Add a splash of olive oil. Sear chicken on all sides and remove from pan. Reduce heat to med-low. Sprinkle flour into same pan and stir into oil/juices leftover from chicken.

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Add shallots & leeks and sauté for 4mins. Now add wine, 3 of the thyme & rosemary springs, sliced garlic, peppercorns, and both stocks to the pan and bring to a boil. Lower heat to simmer and add carrots and parsnips. Cover and cook for 5 mins.

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Now place the chicken back into the pan, cover and cook for about 12-15 more minutes, until the chicken is cooked through, (about 6mins in I removed the wilted thyme/rosemary sprigs and replaced with the remaining fresh ones). You’re almost ready for a cozy winter feast! At this point, some recipes remove the chicken & root veggies and reduce the liquid further. We were starving and didn’t bother with that nonsense. Either way your meal will be delicious—no matter how thick your sauce.

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Serve with a winter green, (we chose brussel sprouts); pour a round of red, and bon appétit to a lovely winter meal in with the family.

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….Is that just a leek in your grocery bag or are you just happy to cook an SLD!!??

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From Dish Nicole:

Gnocci glam

I have a love-hate relationship with gnocchi. I love it when it’s light and fluffy and has just the right amount of sauce. I hate it when it’s heavy, gluey and starchy. My fiancé and I attempted to make potato gnocchi a while ago and the outcome ended up heavy and gluey. We tried baking the potatoes then ricing them. We tried boiling the potatoes. Different kinds of potatoes. Every recipe had a different approach and none of them were better than “just okay”. We then visited Lupa, one of Mario Batali’s restaurants and had his ricotta gnocchi. The man knows his pasta. It was the best gnocchi we had ever had (actually everything we had was pretty fantastic). It was like eating a savory cloud. We couldn’t stop thinking about it and went back again. Then I realized that the consistency I was looking for all along was that of ricotta gnocchi. So I found a recipe I liked and got to work. It turned out PERFECT and was super easy. Don’t get me wrong I have had fabulous potato gnocchi, but it’s much more labor intensive. This recipe (taken from Epicurious) is less time consuming and will impress the pants off your friends- it’s that good.

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Serves 4

2 cups whole-milk ricotta (1 pound)

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

1 1/2 cups grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (3 ounces), divided

1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg

1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 stick unsalted butter

2-4 large sage leaves torn into pieces

Parchment paper to layout the pre-cooked gnocchi

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Stir together the ricotta, eggs, 1 cup of the cheese, nutmeg, and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Add in the flour and form into a wet sticky dough.

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Roll out the dough on a well-floured surface with lightly floured hands into 1-inch-thick ropes. Cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces and place on a floured parchment-lined baking sheet.

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Cook gnocchi in batches in a large pot of boiling salted water, adding a few at a time to the pot and stirring occasionally, until cooked through (cut one in half to check). I found that 3 minutes was the perfect amount of time. Lift out with a slotted spoon and set aside.

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While cooking the gnocchi, cook the butter and sage in a skillet over medium heat until the butter is golden brown. (approx 5 minutes). Toss in the gnocchi and serve with the remaining cheese sprinkled on top.

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I think Mario would approve.

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From Dish Deanna:

Taco

During the holidays I always find myself over-doing it with food. I look forward to Christmas and New Year celebrations being over because I know that I can start fresh. This year I was so overwhelmed with cookies, cakes, chocolate, and dinners that I thought I was going to explode. I knew it was bad when I started wearing bigger sweaters.  Bigger sweaters made me realize that I needed to immediately start eating smaller portions. Mini Tacos are a great way to control your portion size and can be served in many settings. I find they are easy to make for a simple night in or even if you’re entertaining a group of people.  For this recipe I enlisted the help of my best friend, Jodi!  We had a great time making these.

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Ingredients:

2 cooked chicken breasts

Juice of 1 lime

1 tablespoon chili powder

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

1 teaspoon ground cumin

Salt and pepper, to taste

24 (3-inch) corn tortillas

Shredded cheddar cheese

Shredded lettuce

Hot sauce (optional)

Sour cream (optional)

Toothpicks

Yields: 24 mini tacos, but can certainly be cut down if only meant for one or two people

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Start by finely shredding the chicken by hand and place into a medium bowl. Add lime juice, chili powder, paprika, cumin, salt and pepper. Toss the mixture until it is thoroughly combined. Next, shred the lettuce.

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Lay the tortillas out for stuffing! If you can’t find mini tortillas, use a 3 inch round cookie cutter and make cut outs from larger tortillas. Place some cheddar cheese on the bottom, a big pinch of chicken, and some lettuce on the tortilla. Wrap up the tortilla and pierce with a toothpick.

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Right before you serve, stick the tacos in the oven at 350 degrees for 10 minutes or so until the tortillas are soft and the cheese is melted.

These mini tacos are so good you’ll want to eat them all!

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From Dish Nicole:

pepperoni white pizza

While I was home over Thanksgiving my family and I ate too much and then talked about how full we were. Then the next day we ate the leftovers and did the whole cycle all over again. A family tradition. One of the great things about my family is that we have a huge family and tons of close friends that are honorary family members. We get together throughout the holiday season and usually we do a pot-luck style gathering due to the amount of people. You always get to sample the holiday classics as well as a new recipe someone was trying out. Some are healthy, and well you know, some call for a pound of butter, a la Julia Child. At one recent get together my mom’s best friend Cindy came over and she mentioned a recipe her daughter had told her to try. Pizza dough made from cauliflower. I was intrigued. When I got back to NYC I started the old Google search and came across a website called Eating Bird Food and got to work making my dough. I made 2 pizzas and they were excellent. I am not saying that you should replace delicious crusty pizza dough with this permanently but it is a healthy alternative and is gluten free for our gluten intolerant friends!

 
Yields 2 Pizza crusts
1 head cauliflower (about 2 cups riced)
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup part-skim shredded mozzarella cheese
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon dried oregano
Salt & Pepper

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Start off by preheating your oven to 400 degrees. Grease your cookie sheets or use a pizza stone. I recommend using a pizza stone if you have one. (I do not but you bet I’ll be registering for one!) Remove all the stems and leaves from the cauliflower and chop into small chunks.

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Put all the cauliflower in a food processer and pulse until the cauliflower is ground to a coarse rice consistency. Next you want to cook the cauliflower until it’s translucent. You can do this by microwaving it for 8 minutes or heat in a sauce pan over medium heat. If using the sauce pan, you do not need to add oil, just keep stirring and do not leave unattended. Once the cauliflower is ready you can mix all remaining ingredients in a large bowl. If you would like to add salt and pepper you can do so at this time.

Now you are ready to roll out the dough. Unlike regular dough you do not need to knead the dough. You will simply spread out the dough onto your prepped baking sheets or stone. Bake for 25-30 minutes. The center should be cooked through and the edges will be crispy.

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Remove from the oven and add your toppings. Here is what I used:

fixins
Pizza 1: tomato sauce, fresh mozzarella cheese, onion, pepperoni & fresh chopped basil
Pizza 2: red potatoes thinly sliced, ricotta cheese, fresh mozzarella cheese & fresh chopped basil

baking
Once your pizzas are ready you are going to put them back in the oven and broil for approximately 5-8 minutes or until the cheese is melted. Slice and eat immediately.

pizza!
You won’t trick any bread lovers but this pizza sure was tasty. Grab a fork and knife, you will need it, and eat away.

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