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Posts Tagged ‘Dish Danielle’

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I have raved about the incredibly talented, (and crazy stylish!) chef Marcus Samuelsson here before, and this months’ recipe is yet another amazing staple I’ve learned from one of his wonderful cookbooks. This streamlined pickling process is such a cinch, you won’t ever need to look back at this recipe after you’ve pickled your first batch. I actually made these bad boys at the end of the winter, when I wasn’t able to get through all the vegetables that my kick-ass winter CSA bestowed upon me. This was a great way to make sure my kohlrabies, beets, daikon radishes, and carrots didn’t go to waste before I had a chance to use them.

But. In all honesty, I think spring & summer is the best time to get your pickle on: picnics, BBQ’s, beach days… Burgers, seafood sammys, charcuterie boards, (oh my!)… They’re all screaming for some sweet & tangy garnishes. Happy pickling!

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(Adapted from Aquavit, by chef Marcus Samuelsson)

For the pickling liquid:

3 c boiling water

2 c white vinegar

1 c sugar

Liberal pinches of the following: kosher salt, turmeric, assorted peppercorns coriander seeds, (toasted and crushed)

A few cardamom pods, (toasted & crushed)

A few cloves

A few juniper berries

2 bay leafs

1 shallot, sliced thin

fresh parsley

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* You do not have to have EVERY item on this list to make pickles! Just go with what’cha got!

To Pickle:

3 beets, peeled, rinsed, & cut into wedges/sticks/slices

2 kohlrabies, peeled, rinsed, & cut into wedges/sticks/slices

1 small daikon radish, peeled, rinsed, & cut into wedges/sticks/slices

3 carrots, peeled, rinsed, & cut into wedges/sticks/slices

*Pickle whatever you want! Doesn’t need to be these items…

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In a medium bowl, combine the boiling water, vinegar & sugar. Whisk so sugar dissolves. Allow mix to cool a bit. Then, stir in the remaining ‘pickling liquid’ ingredients.

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Arrange soon-to-be-pickled veggies in jars and pour the liquid in over them. You can enjoy the pickles as soon as the following day—or wait a few days for a stronger pickle. They’ll keep for about 2 weeks.

Danielle Hot Dog GoogaMooga

Make yourself a killer sammy, garnish with homemade pickles, and take that sucker OUTSIDE! Happy season of eating outdoors!

The incredibly talented, (and crazy stylish!) chef Marcus Samuelsson:

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From Dish Danielle:

Pinch a Pisces!
…Or maybe make them some ice cream instead?

pretty

March marks my birthday month and to celebrate like any sweet-toothed Pisces should, I gathered my nearest & dearest round for some cones & cocktails.  I’d tried my hand at this recipe the weekend prior, but on my 31st, I wondered if the wisdom of this new prime number might perhaps enable me to make a more sophisticated batch…?

I was absolutely spot on, and my second try absolutely bested my first.

Did you know Pisces are apparently very intuitive?

zest again

Ingredients:

2c whole milk

2c heavy cream

6 blood oranges: 4tbs zest & 1c juice

6 large egg yolks

¾ c sugar

zest infusing 2

In a small pot, place milk & cream over low heat.  Add 3tbs zest, whisking to incorporate. Allow liquid to come to temp slowly, letting the zest impart its delicious flavor.

yolks

Put yolks in a small bowl next to the pot on the stove. When milk/cream is hot enough, (just before boiling), add juice & sugar to yolks.

orange juice

Whisk vigorously to incorporate. Use a spouted receptacle and scoop up approx. 1c of hot liquid. Pour liquid in a slow and steady stream into the yolk mixture while SIMULTANEOUSLY whisking like hell. Once the yolks have been tempered, (that’s what that last move is called), dump that mixture back into the pot. Using a wooden spoon, stir slowly while custard continues to cook over low heat. Prepare an ice bath with a glass or metal bowl nested on top. The custard will eventually begin to thicken considerably, which means the yolks have been cooked properly (don’t raise the heat much—that could result in an overly eggy-flavored ice cream. Patience is a virtue that this Piscean dish barely has. If I can wait it out, you can too!).

straingin

Once the custard has thickened, immediately pour it through a fine strainer and into the bowl in the ice bath. This will strain out the zest—we’ll add a bit of fresh stuff later. Stir gently to cool. Once the custard has come down in temp, place it in the fridge for a good 5-6 hours, or overnight.

icecream

Once you’re ready to churn, get your ice cream making apparatus ready. Before pouring the custard in, buzz the liquid with an immersion blender if you have one, (if not, pour it into a well sealed container and shake it like mad). After 20-25 mins of churning, your ice cream should be close to ready. At this point, with the machine still running, sprinkle in the remaining 1tbsp of fresh zest for a pop of color and an added zip of flavor. Store in a freezer friendly container once it’s finished. I usually allow the ice cream to sit in the freezer for another few hours before serving.

ladies eating icecream

Scoop into sugar cones and dole out to your guests during your next social gathering!

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From Dish Danielle:

ugly

What’s a dish to do with the ugliest character in her winter CSA share!? Eat ‘em fresh! I personally had never been confronted by this mysterious German turnip before, and I will admit, that I left it abandoned in my fridge’s crisper for far longer than I should have… Once I finally worked up the nerve to peel, slice, and sample this crunchy orb, I found it surprisingly mild in flavor and still very fresh considering it’s relegated hibernation…ahem. A fresh winter salad recipe is below. This is loose so feel free to add/subtract & riff on it to create the perfect winter salad for you:

Kohlrabichiffonaide 2cut

Ingredients:
-1 medium Kohlrabi, peeled
-1 medium bunch Lacinto Kale, destemmed and chiffonaded.
-1 bunch of dill, rough chopped
-1 c dried sour cherries
-grated zest of 1 lemon
-4-6 tbsp, fresh squeezed lemon juice
-few splashes of olive oil
-a squeeze or two of honey
-2-3 garlic cloves, minced
-S&P to taste
-1c alfalfa sprouts (if you’d like)

matchsticks

Peel the kohlrabi and cut into thick matchsticks that are 1/4″ wide & 2″ long.

almost donw

Place all ingredients, (minus the sprouts if you’re using them), into a medium sized salad bowl. Get in there with your hands and massage the mixture–this allows the lemon to soften both the kale & kohlrabi just a bit. Let the salad sit for about 10minutes.

*chef’s note: I only had 1/2 a bunch of kale, so I used a mixture of kale and added 2 large handfuls of my CSA mesclun salad mix, which was great!

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Add the sprouts and mix once more–making sure to separate the threadlike bundle and incorporating thoroughly. Now’s the time to taste and adjust the salt/honey levels if needed. If you find a puddle of dressing at the bottom of your salad bowl, using tongs, lift the salad and place into another bowl leaving the juices behind.

Happy crunching!

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From Dish Nicole:
Ginger scallion - 09

It’s always nice to have a recipe that’s an old standby when you have little or no time to come up with something.  It’s also nice when said recipe is simple and delicious and does not need to be improved upon what so ever.  My new “old standby” is David Chang’s ginger scallion sauce.  Just to give a little background, David Chang is a Korean-American chef and is chef/founder of the Momofuku restaurant group, which includes Momofuku Noodle Bar, Momofuku Ssäm Bar, Má Pêche, Milk Bar and Momofuku Ko in NYC just to name a few.  I have only been to the Noodle Bar and my taste buds did a happy dance when I took the first bite into my ginger scallion noodles.  I am slightly ramen obsessed and I would definitely say this was my favorite ramen dish to date.  I decided that I should make my old standby for my old standby (Dish Danielle) when she came over after work one night.  You can make the sauce ahead of time, in fact it’s recommended for flavor infusion, so you have plenty of time to catch up with your pal.  I also had some bok choy on hand so I decided to sauté that up and serve up with the noodles along with a lovely little cucumber salad.

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Cucumber salad:

2 medium cucumbers thinly sliced

1/4 cup rice vinegar

1 teaspoon sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

I started out by making the cucumber salad and setting aside to garnish the noodles with later.  Simply slice and mix all of the ingredients in a bowl and refrigerate until you are ready to use.

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For the sauce:

2 1/2 c. thinly sliced scallions (greens & whites from 1 to 2 large bunches)

1/2 c. finely minced peeled fresh ginger

1/2 c. grape seed or other neutral oil

1 1/2 tsp. light soy sauce

3/4 tsp. sherry wine vinegar

3/4 tsp. Kosher salt, or more to taste

2 packages dried ramen noodles (I use the Ka-me Chinese noodles)

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To make the sauce mix together the scallions, ginger, oil, soy sauce, vinegar, and salt in a bowl. Taste and add more salt or soy sauce if needed.  Make the sauce at least 15-20 minutes before you plan to serve it so the flavors infuse.

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Set aside the sauce and boil water for the noodles and prep your bok choy.  I like to leave the bok choy in thin long slices and I sautéed with minced garlic and a little sesame oil until soft (approx 5-8 minutes).

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Cook the noodles for 3 minutes, drain and serve with the ginger scallion sauce, cucumbers and the bok       choy.  For those of you that like a little kick in your food, add a little sriracha and enjoy.

Actually I’d say best served with a best friend and gossip.

**Another great thing about this sauce is that it keeps well for several days and its delicious served on fish, eggs, rice etc.

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From Dish Danielle:

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Over holiday break I spent a cozy week in Northern Indiana’s cornfield country with my beau and his family. It was much colder than it’s been here in Brooklyn, and one snowy evening, I caught a hankering for some sort of ‘red wine & chicken’ supper. After a short trip to their local organic market and an even shorter trip into Evelyn’s pantry (where she’s got her summer garden’s remaining bounty) she & I decided to whip up our own speedier rendition of the French classic ‘Coq au Vin.’

Ingredients:

  • olive oil
  • 2 large chicken breasts w/skin, cut in half
  • 4 chicken thighs with skin
  • cumin
  • S&P
  • about 2 c dry red wine (we used a pinot noir that was on hand)
  • 3 shallots, diced
  • 1 HUGE leek, sliced & rinsed thoroughly
  • 6 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 6 fresh rosemary springs
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 add’l garlic cloves sliced thin
  • 1 tbsp whole black peppercorns
  • 2 tbsps all purpose flour
  • 1 ½ c chicken stock
  • 1 c beef stock
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 4 carrots, peeled & diced into 1½ ” pieces
  • 4 parsnips, peeled & diced into 1½” pieces

The first thing we did was prep the chicken: I consulted a few recipes online, and most of them called for an overnight marinade. As it was already after 7pm, Evelyn and I decided to give the chicken a nice flavorful rub to ensure its deliciousness and eliminate the need to put the meal off another day. So: pat chicken dry and sprinkle cumin, salt & pepper on all sides liberally. Then rub the minced garlic onto chicken on all sides.

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Place a deep cast iron over medium high heat. Add a splash of olive oil. Sear chicken on all sides and remove from pan. Reduce heat to med-low. Sprinkle flour into same pan and stir into oil/juices leftover from chicken.

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Add shallots & leeks and sauté for 4mins. Now add wine, 3 of the thyme & rosemary springs, sliced garlic, peppercorns, and both stocks to the pan and bring to a boil. Lower heat to simmer and add carrots and parsnips. Cover and cook for 5 mins.

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Now place the chicken back into the pan, cover and cook for about 12-15 more minutes, until the chicken is cooked through, (about 6mins in I removed the wilted thyme/rosemary sprigs and replaced with the remaining fresh ones). You’re almost ready for a cozy winter feast! At this point, some recipes remove the chicken & root veggies and reduce the liquid further. We were starving and didn’t bother with that nonsense. Either way your meal will be delicious—no matter how thick your sauce.

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Serve with a winter green, (we chose brussel sprouts); pour a round of red, and bon appétit to a lovely winter meal in with the family.

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….Is that just a leek in your grocery bag or are you just happy to cook an SLD!!??

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From Dish Danielle:

upclose churn

I know it’s freezing out, but I am an ice cream maniac who finds any excuse to whip up a homemade batch. My latest ice cream intention was for a New Years Eve party I co-hosted for some dear friends who recently got engaged, (Congrats DZF & VMF!)… A party at the Whisk & Ladle ain’t no party without ice cream cones served around midnight, so I got to work.

engagment party pic

Ingredients:
2 c buttermilk (try to get full fat if you can find it)
2 c heavy cream
5 egg yolks
¾-1 c sugar, give or take
pinch of salt
zest & juice of 1 lemon

*you’ll also need some sort of ice cream churning apparatus

yolk

Gently bring buttermilk & heavy cream to just under a boil in a medium stockpot. While it’s warming, crack your eggs and toss yolks into a med sized bowl. Whisk sugar (start with ¾ c) into yolks once liquid is up to temp.

whisk

Now you’ll need to temper your yolks, which is the one delicate part of this recipe: If you’re doing this alone place yolk bowl atop a pot holder/dish towel so it doesn’t slide around your counter. Using a liquid measuring cup with a spout, scoop up 1c of the warm mixture. Begin whisking yolks with one hand. Don’t stop. Use other to pour the hot mixture into yolks in a very slow, steady stream. Don’t stop whisking. Once it’s all in there you can dump the tempered yolks back into the stockpot. Over a med-low flame, continue to cook custard, stirring constantly. Add dash of salt. Taste the custard to see if you’d like to add a little more sugar, (do that now if so). You’ll know it’s ready when the custard thickens and coats the back of a wooden spoon.

stir

Immediately remove custard from pot and pour into metal bowl. Ice-bath it to cool it down before storing it in fridge, (meaning, place the metal bowl of hot custard into a larger bowl full of ice & cold water. Stir to speed up cooling process).

zest

Leave the custard in fridge until it’s as cold as the fridge, (either overnight or about 3 hours). Once the custard is cold, zest & juice your lemon. Toss the zest & half of its juice in. Taste the custard and decide if you want to add the remaining lemon juice.

churn

Now you’re ready to churn this delicious batch of ice cream!  Serve some killer ice cream cones to your favorite peeps. Happy New Years y’all!

midnight

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From Dish Danielle:

glam

A week before Thanksgiving with no real holiday plans, the bf and I decided to host a little something at my place. We felt the right thing to do was to bring all the turkey day strays together to share a proper feast. The 8-10 person guest list quickly grew to 18… My one requirement: bring a dish to share with the group! This was a holiday potluck, so I honed in on the one dish the hostess would be responsible for: the turkey complete with stuffing.* I ordered a bird from a local farm upstate and was informed she (Florence…yes we named her…), was sacrificed only 4-5 days before our feast! Fresh as a daisy, I had to do right by her. I resolved to use every scrap of pretty Florence that I could, both pre/post roasting.

florence thanksgiving

This meal was honestly the very best Thanksgiving spread I have ever seen/eaten. Everyone’s contributions were absolutely deeeelicious. Although I sent everyone home with piles of left-overs, the bird was far from stripped. I decided to make a soup with the leftover odds & ends.

DISCLAIMER: This recipe is NOT meant to be followed to a tee! Riff on it however you see fit. Hang onto your roasting scraps and see where your soup takes you. This kind of soup can be made all winter long and interpreted in many different ways.  It’s time consuming but fairly hands off, so great to make while you’re having a cozy afternoon at home. What scraps do you having looming in your fridge right now?

soup ingredients

Ingredients:

1 bird carcass

3 leeks, rinsed and sliced (tops also rinsed, sliced and set aside)

4 shallots, sliced

1 head of fennel cut into 1” chunks

10 garlic cloves, sliced

2 parsnips

3 carrots

¾ bottle of white wine

1 box veggie stock

3 qts water

3 bay leaves

1 apple, pitted & chopped

1 pear, pitted & chopped

2 apple cores (leftover stuffing scraps)

2 pear cores  (leftover stuffing scraps)

2 stems of sage

1 handful of rough chopped fresh parsley

2 handfuls small potatoes, cut into 2” chunks

1 bunch fresh thyme, pruned and rough chopped

red chili pepper flakes

S&P

cheesecloth

leeks

Start by sautéing leeks, shallots, and fennel in your largest stock pot over med-low heat. Add garlic and cook until fragrant. Add parsnips/carrots and cook for 5mins. Add wine and raise heat to simmer. Pour the rest into a wine glass and enjoy. Sip and simmer for 20mins. Add stock, water, and bay leaf. Once you’re back to a simmer add Flor the bird! Arrange so it’s completely submerged. Toss in two pinches red chili flakes. Let it bubble awhile…

cheese cloth

Now, pile the leftover scraps into several small heaps: the apples/pears, the cores, the leek tops, and the sage. Using the cheesecloth, bundle 2-3 small piles up into the cloth and tie with kitchen string. Drop satchels into soup and continue to simmer. Add thyme. Season with S&P. Add potatoes. Soup should be just about done when potatoes are cooked to your liking. Remove from heat and discard cheesecloth bundles. Pull the bird out of the soup and allow to cool on large platter. Tear meat off bones, shred into smaller pieces and toss back into the pot.

soupmeats

Once soup has cooled, skim fat off top.

Garnish with fresh parsley, serve with crusty bread and a glass of apple cider. Enjoy turkey day’s bounty one more time and count the things you’re thankful for. It’s holiday season y’all.

*I hate to admit it but, dish Amelia’s pumpernickel & rye stuffing bested this hostess’s!

Florio final

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