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Archive for July, 2011

Ed.’s Note: We’re trying something new at SLD! This month, the Dishes have each agreed to flip through the archives and cook another girl’s recipe, with modifications to reflect differences in her own taste preferences and/or cooking style. The idea is to feature some of the terrific recipes we’ve collected in 2+ years at Saucy Little Dish, and also to show by example the way that these posts are just guidelines that can inspire new dishes, with just a dash of creativity.

From Dish Danielle:

First off, I want to say that it’s been a great exercise to peruse the old SLD archives. (Thanks Rachelle!) As I combed through the last two years of recipes, I came across MANY I had meant to try, but never made the time to do so, (note to self: make more time for this). It’s fun to look back at the winding culinary path all of us have taken since the site launched in May of ‘09. Here’s to continuing to expand as well as challenge our foodnerd brains for many more years to come…

I was inspired to try my hand at fried green tomatoes this weekend for two reasons: 1. Dish Rachelle’s July 2010 post totally whet my appetite for them (I honestly did not purposely chose a post from exactly a year ago…). and 2. I had the pleasure of attending another north Brooklyn based supperclub called ‘Neighbor’ this weekend, who served them aside their salad course and I thought, ‘YUM. Wait. I want to try these…’

I went BLT style.

Start by making your mayo.

For the Basil Mayo:
1 egg yolk
½-1 tsp salt
½ tsp dry mustard powder
1-2 tsp sugar
2 tsp fresh lemon juice
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
½ clove of garlic
½c packed basil leaves
1 cup safflower or corn oil

Whisk vinegar & lemon juice in small bowl. In food processor or blender, toss in yolk, salt, mustard, sugar, & garlic. Puree/pulse briefly. Add half of vinegar/lemon liquid and run for 10 seconds. Add basil and remaining vin/lemon–run for another 10 seconds. Let machine run while pouring the oil in a slow steady stream. Mayo should get thick & frothy. Stop once it’s light in color—mayo will ‘break’ if run too long. Set aside and get crackin’ on your tomatoes.

For the tomatoes: (this will make 3 BLT’s with enough leftover tomatoes for snacking. *this recipe is adapted from an April 2009 Epicurious post.)
2-3 green tomatoes, sliced, ¼’’ thick
S&P
½ c flour
½ c buttermilk, shaken
dash hot sauce
½ c cornmeal
1c panko crumbs
veggie oil for frying

For the BLT assembly:
Handful of fried bacon strips
3 English muffins
some nice crisp lettuce leaves

Season tomato slices with S&P. Pour flour onto a plate. Whisk buttermilk & hot sauce in shallow bowl. Mix cornmeal & panko in shallow bowl. Before you prep the tomatoes, now would be the time to get your bacon frying. Once that’s going, ready another pan for tomato frying. Oil ½’’ deep is plenty. Place oil over med-high heat. Back to tomatoes: Coat them in flour, dunk them in buttermilk, and nestle them into cornmeal/panko mix, making sure they’re battered evenly. Once oil is hot enough (350 degrees or so), fry them off! They’ll take about 2 minutes on each side. Oh—and don’t forget to flip your bacon…





Place tomatoes on paper towels to drain/cool slightly. Toast your muffins & prep your lettuce. It’s almost time to eat! Assemble your delectable BLT’s and enjoy for breakfast, lunch, or a light summer supper…Best enjoyed beneath a glowing igloo on a cool Brooklyn rooftop.

Sidebar: These were the first BLT’s I’ve ever made, and they’ll be on heavy rotation for the rest of the season.

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Ed.’s Note: We’re trying something new at SLD! This month, the Dishes have each agreed to flip through the archives and cook another girl’s recipe, with modifications to reflect differences in her own taste preferences and/or cooking style. The idea is to feature some of the terrific recipes we’ve collected in 2+ years at Saucy Little Dish, and also to show by example the way that these posts are just guidelines that can inspire new dishes, with just a dash of creativity.

From Dish Gwen:

Brisket? In July? During a New York City Heat Wave? What are you thinking?!

I was thinking “Let’s get this freaking brisket out my freezer and make room for ice cream!” And I wanted brisket sandwiches to take to the beach. Just four hours of blistering inferno in my kitchen and it was all worth it.

This is based on Dish Jodi’s leg of lamb recipe from back in April. The only difference is that I used a brisket, which is a big hunk of fatty beef, instead of lamb, which is a baby sheep. I also substitute paprika for cumin because I didn’t have any cumin, and I used both white and red wine, because I had two half bottles of white and red.

Ingredients:
– A 3-4 lb brisket
– Salt
– Black Pepper
– Olive Oil
– 1/2 bottle of white wine
– ½ bottle of red wine
– 1 head of garlic
– 4 or 5 sprigs of thyme
– 4 or 5 sprigs of oregano
– a dozen or so cardamom pods
– 1 teaspoon paprika
– 1 cinnamon stick

Directions:

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Heat oil to medium in a large pot, and rub the brisket with with olive oil and salt and pepper generously. Sear the brisket on all sides until brown and crispy, then set aside on a plate.

Keep the pot simmering, and pour in the wine into pot and stir with the meat drippings (as Jodi puts it, “scrape up all the yummy brown bits”). Break up the head of garlic and put it and the rest of the ingredients into wine.

Bring to simmer then put the brisket back in, and add water until the brisket is completely covered (this is also something that strays from Jodi’s recipe – a braised Brisket generally requires to be fully submerged in liquid. Don’t ask me, ask your Jewish grandmother.) Cover and put in oven for FOUR HOURS.

While your meat simmers, you should retire to the air conditioned bedroom and watch a couple of movies or several HBO miniseries episodes in a row. And have a beer.

Pull out the brisket, eat half of it with some bread and salad, and put the rest in the fridge so you can slice it up and make sandwiches later. Save all of the beef stock that’s left in the pan too – it’s good broth and you can make gravy with it. Just strain the stock into a couple of tupperwares and throw them in the freezer for later. Brisket!

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Ed.’s Note: We’re trying something new at SLD! This month, the Dishes have each agreed to flip through the archives and cook another girl’s recipe, with modifications to reflect differences in her own taste preferences and/or cooking style. The idea is to feature some of the terrific recipes we’ve collected in 2+ years at Saucy Little Dish, and also to show by example the way that these posts are just guidelines that can inspire new dishes, with just a dash of creativity.

From Dish Erin:

I’m not going to lie.  I forgot I was supposed to redo a Dish’s dish this week.  Whoops. This oversight has led me to an egregious miscalculation: I made a soup on the hottest day of the year.  Please, do not attempt this dish until at least September, when the heat index is below 114 degrees.  Apologies in advance.  Here’s what happened:

Caught unprepared, I opened my fridge and thought, I can do this.  I can make something resembling a dish from SLD.

And here’s the beauty of it: From a fridge full of nothing but some wilting kale, a package of chorizo, and a pint of chicken stock, I not only made something, I made something pretty delicious. (Thanks to the plethora of awesome recipes on SLD, of course.)

Jodi made a sausage, kale and white bean dish last Fall that I’ve wanted to make since the post first debuted.  Then this past month, Gwen made a chicken soup with lemon that struck me as brilliant in it’s simplicity.  I didn’t have enough ingredients on hand to make either.  But if I combined them…

Based off my ingredient list, I came up with the idea of making a chorizo based lemony soup with kale.  I didn’t have beans or noodles, unfortunately.  But I did have a little quinoa, a grain that in my opinion, can never hurt in any broth-based soup.

I have no idea if this sounds ill-conceived or bizarre to normal people, as I am incapable of thinking that any dish containing lemon and chorizo is anything but delicious.

So here’s what I came up with in my devotion to you, dear readers, and in the spirit that is Saucy Little Dish:

Olive oil for sauteing
1/2 onion, diced
1 garlic clove, minced
2 chorizo links, sliced thin
4 cups chicken stock
2 sprigs fresh thyme (or 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme)
3-4 thin thin slices of lemon
1/4 cup quinoa (you could also use diced potatoes or white beans)
2 cups kale, ribs removed, roughly chopped
Salt & Pepper to taste

1.) Heat olive oil over medium heat.  Add onion and garlic and saute until onion is translucent.  Add chorizo, stirring every few minutes, until fat in chorizo starts to render, about 5-7 minutes.

2.) Add chicken stock, lemon slices, thyme and quinoa (or beans or potatoes, whatever you’re using), bring to a boil, and then simmer for about 20-25 minutes until grains are cooked.  You can put the top on for a bit, just make sure to stir gently once or twice.

3.) Add the kale, and salt & pepper to taste.

Serve in bowls, preferably not on the hottest day of the year.  I didn’t have any on hand, but I bet a little Manchego cheese sprinkled on top would be pretty awesome.

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Ed.’s Note: We’re trying something new at SLD! This month, the Dishes have each agreed to flip through the archives and cook another girl’s recipe, with modifications to reflect differences in her own taste preferences and/or cooking style. The idea is to feature some of the terrific recipes we’ve collected in 2+ years at Saucy Little Dish, and also to show by example the way that these posts are just guidelines that can inspire new dishes, with just a dash of creativity.

From Dish Nicole:

Back in May, I read Jodi’s post for her “Eggplant Zucchini Soup with Kale Chips” and I went home and made it that night. The recipe was delicious but it made more than I could eat in one sitting. So the next day as it’s chilling in my fridge, I thought why not serve it cold? I spiced it up with items from my spice drawer, added more Greek yogurt and served it chilled with toasted pita. I even brought the leftovers to a party that night and served it as a dip, which was met with rave reviews. I decided that this was one recipe I was going to keep on file and make again.

Because yesterday was a real scorcher, I decided to forgo roasting the zucchini in an attempt to keep the apartment a little cooler and I eliminated the eggplant. Here is everything else you will need for my chilled version:

4-5 medium sized zucchinis- washed and chopped, skin on
4c chicken or vegetable stock
1 small Vidalia onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, pressed
2tsp cumin
Pinch of red pepper flakes
3tbsp olive oil
2 cups Greek yogurt
Salt & pepper
1/2c diced chives to garnish

To start, heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook until the onions are soft. Mix in the chopped zucchini and continue to cook over medium heat until soft- about 10 minutes. Next, add in the stock, salt & pepper, red pepper flakes and cumin. Let the mixture simmer for about 15 minutes.

Take the pot off the stove and allow the soup to cool slightly. I used an immersion blender to puree the soup, but a food processor or a blender will do the trick as well. Allow the soup to continue to cool until it’s about room temperature. Last but not least, stir in the yogurt and with chives. Mmmmmmmm. So let this be a lesson, don’t be afraid to play with your food.

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Ed.’s Note: We’re trying something new at SLD! This month, the Dishes have each agreed to flip through the archives and cook another girl’s recipe, with modifications to reflect differences in her own taste preferences and/or cooking style. The idea is to feature some of the terrific recipes we’ve collected in 2+ years at Saucy Little Dish, and also to show by example the way that these posts are just guidelines that can inspire new dishes, with just a dash of creativity.

From Dish Jodi:

My college roomie is coming into town this weekend, so when searching for a SLD recipe to “revisit” I immediately went to breakfast. What better way to host a good friend who arrives late at night,  than crunchy, sweet pancakes waiting for her in the sunny LA morning. And, not to take anything away from Erin’s brilliant idea, I could add to the SLD archives with a basic pancake recipe that you can make on your own. (read: I didn’t have any Aunt Jemima mix on hand.) Because it’s summer in LA, strawberries are EVERYWHERE – even soon to be in my garden!

What better start to a great weekend? Pancakes in the AM, then a drive up the coast for a wine festival in Santa Barbara. Yes please.

Ingredients:

8 oz Milk
2 Large Eggs
2 Oz Butter (Melted and cooled)
1 tsp Vanilla
8 Oz Flour (I used half all-purpose, half whole wheat)
2 Tbsp Sugar
2 tsp Baking Powder
1 tsp Salt
Fresh Strawberries diced small
Fingerfulls of Crunchy Granola

Mix the wet ingredients, then the dry ingredients separately. Combine and mix gently.


Put quarter cup or so scoops on your hot and lightly oiled griddle and after it spreads sprinkle the granola and berries on top. Cook the way you cook pancakes. You know, til they puff and the bubbles pop to leave holes in the top. Flip, cook some more, enjoy with your favorite syrupy syrup.

Please note that instead of one of me eating these pancakes, I include a photo of Cheryl and I from of our FRESHMAN YEAR of college. NOT NOW. 1998. I SWEAR…ALSO – Why are we posed like that? Why was my face so fat? Does Cheryl still have that killer leather jacket? (I’ll report back on the last one after this weekend.) Ah, being 18 and lame.

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From Dish Rachelle:

We’re trying something new at SLD! This month, the Dishes have each agreed to flip through the archives and cook another girl’s recipe, with modifications to reflect differences in her own taste preferences and/or cooking style. The idea is to feature some of the terrific recipes we’ve collected in 2+ years at Saucy Little Dish, and also to show by example the way that these posts are just guidelines that can inspire new dishes, with just a dash of creativity.

I chose to re-cook Dish Danielle’s Pecan Ice Cream (with bourbon syrup & candied pecan pieces) for two reasons. I was lucky to attend a small dinner party at “The Fort” last week, and was reminded that she is not only an extraordinary hostess, but also a talented ice cream chef when she served us all individual sugar cones topped with a pink scoop of raspberry-mint ice cream. It was sweet, herbal, and the perfect end to a great meal in a steamy Brooklyn apartment. The Boy and I have also been meaning to make peach ice cream, after buying a $5 barrel of beautiful Jersey peaches at a roadside farm stand over July 4th weekend. When I stumbled upon this recipe, I knew that I could trust Dish Danielle’s proportions for the ice cream. I also thought that bourbon would be the perfect flavor to complement the sweet summer fruit.


First, make the bourbon syrup:

1 cup bourbon
3/4 cup sugar

Pour bourbon and sugar in small pot. Bring to low boil, allowing sugar to dissolve and mixture to reduce by at least half. Let boil for good while until it becomes slightly thick — like runny honey.

Pour the mixture into a small bowl and set it in the freezer to cool.

Time to start the peach ice cream:

3-4 ripe peaches
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup 2% milk
5 egg yolks
Sugar to taste

Peel the peaches – if they’re ripe enough, you can do it with your fingers. Roughly chop them and put them in a medium-sized saucepan in a shallow pool of water, and simmer them over a medium-low flame for about 10 minutes, until they soften. Using a potato masher, crush the peaches and then let them sit over heat for another 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and, using a hand blender or food processor, blend them. Leave the peaches slightly chunky for rustic ice cream, or puree them finely and then run them through a sieve for a smooth, consistent texture.


Combine milk and cream in a saucepan and heat over medium-low. Meanwhile, separate your eggs (saving the whites for some meringues or tomorrow’s egg white omelette) and in a large bowl, slowly whisk the yolks together with the bourbon syrup. Be especially careful if the syrup is still a little warm – you can prevent the eggs from cooking by tempering them: incorporating just a small stream of syrup at a time.

Temper the yolk/syrup mixture a second time by adding the milk from the stove top into the large bowl, using a heatsafe measuring cup. Once the milk and syrup mix is combined, pour it all back into the saucepan and heat it over medium-high, stirring frequently. (If some yolky bits have become cooked, no worries – just run the whole thing through a strainer as you pour it into the saucepan). Add the pureed peaches. The custard will thicken quickly. Taste to adjust the sugar – if the peaches are sweet enough, it won’t need any extra, but it depends on the ripeness of the fruit and your preference. Once it has reduced by ½-inch or more, and it sticks to the back of a spoon, remove from heat and let it cool in a sealed container overnight – or at minimum, for six hours.

The next day, run the custard through your ice cream maker for about 15 minutes, and then store in it in the freezer. This made some of the best ice cream I’ve ever tasted: peachy, bourbon-y, delicious.

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From Dish Amelia:

Being near a food market right now feels like: anything is possible and life is short. The market is full of fabulous ingredients and we better hop to. We have all the vocabulary needed to say whatever needs to be said. Get crazy and let go. Take control, be measured and experience joy. Press Play.


For the soup:

6 ears fresh corn, kernels cut off cobs, cobs scraped and reserved
4 shallots, finely diced
1 bay leaf
2 quarts light vegetable stock
s+p
1-2 T olive oil

Saute shallots. Add bay leaf, corn, cobs and scrapings and cover with stock. Let simmer for a while. 15-20 minutes? Remove bay leaf and cobs. Blend with an immersion blender for a long time, until you feel you have a pretty smooth puree. Then blend more. Get another pot and a chinoise and pass the soup through the chinoise a bit at a time using a rubber spatula and discard solids.

Then do this again. This takes a while, but it yields a satiny smooth concise corn soup. Chill in an ice bath, then refrigerate overnight.

For the Scapegoat Toasts

(Scapes are lovely and weird seasonal ingredients that look like electrical cable. They are the above-ground side of garlic and have a pretty loud garlicky flavor but greener.)

bread sliced thin for toasting (i used pumpernickel)
6 raw scape tendrils (trim ends and points, and chop)
2 bunches of basil
a handful of pecans
some finely grated parmesan
lemon zest from half a lemon
olive oil
goat cheese
s+p

Combine scapes, basil, nuts, parm and zest in food processor. Pulse. Add olive oil until proper pesto texture is achieved. Season to taste. Toast rounds, schmear with goat cheese, and add a layer of scape pesto on top, get it? Top with edible flower, float on cold corn soup.

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